Top Tips For Eating Well On A Gluten Free Diet


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Top Tips For Eating Well On A Gluten Free Diet

Going on a gluten-free diet is no walk in the park. Shape published a Kettle and Fire survey of over 2,500 adults and their eating habits, revealing that only 12% of people have found success in sticking to a gluten-free diet. What’s more, those that comprise this small percentage only manage to maintain it within 6-12 months. To help you out, we’ve come up with tips on how to find success on a gluten-free diet. But first, let’s talk about why you might need to do it in the first place.

Why is gluten so bad?

Gluten is a type of protein family found in grains such as wheat, rye, barley, and spelt. It can cause sensitivity in up to 13% of people and a complete intolerance in 1% of the population. This is called celiac disease. People who are allergic to gluten can suffer from digestive issues like diarrhea, constipation, and bloating. It can also cause anemia, nutrient deficiencies, chronic inflammation, and an increased risk of other diseases. Gluten can also make it difficult to remain active, as tiredness is a common symptom of the condition. Sticking to your CrossFit routine, for example, might be challenging when you have no energy to spare. And while there are supplements like Nova Max Perform and Max Adrenal to help increase your energy for workouts, fixing your diet first and foremost is an important foundation to having better energy levels and overall health. Avoiding gluten is therefore not a choice for some people, but a necessity in the path to wellness.

How do I stick to a gluten-free diet?

Do your research. Going gluten-free can be a pain, as options can sometimes be scarce. In any case, it’s best to memorize what food to avoid. These include bread, pasta, cereals, pastries, processed snacks, sauces/dressings, and beer. Make it a habit of yours to ask for the gluten-free option in restaurants and try not to be tempted by trendy food items, which most likely contain gluten. Read the fine print. Food labels are there for a reason: to inform people of allergens. The Food and Drug Administration also warns against gluten-free claims in processed products, as some of them might be cross-contaminated. If your gluten intolerance is high, it’s best to avoid processed food completely. Eat well-balanced meals. It’s easy to fall into the trap of eating an unbalanced diet when avoiding gluten. You may, for example, compensate by overeating meat and dairy as those are naturally gluten-free or turn to processed food instead. Other than protein, make sure to consume the right amount of fat and of course, carbohydrates from non-wheat sources like potatoes. An article by Parsley Health on whether potatoes are actually healthy, describes them as a power-carb that you should definitely have on your plate, as they are rich in essential vitamins and minerals like potassium and Vitamin C. Focusing on whole food ensures that you don't miss out on key nutrients, and the key to maintaining the nutritional value of ingredients like potatoes is through preparation — try baking them instead of deep frying. Take advantage of technology. It’s true that there’s an app for almost everything — even for finding gluten-free options outside. For example, the Find Me Gluten Free app is particularly useful for eating out, as it lists down restaurants with gluten-free offerings. Grocery shopping, on the other hand, is made easier with the Gluten Free Scanner, which lists down products to avoid and to buy in supermarkets. With these apps, you can find recipes, track food, and scan ingredients, making your gluten-free diet a lot more manageable.


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